Search results for “tax”

A Failed Session? Will The Courts Negate The Taxes?

A Constitutional Crisis has now arrived. The Legislative leaders did the unthinkable. They blatantly raised taxes several times and in several ways that the constitution strictly forbids.  Today, the session has adjourned ‘sine die’ [latin for “with no appointed date for resumption”] . Tax Week Failures   When the two chambers failed to legally pass enough revenue increases before last Monday morning, to pacify the state’s appetite; The […]

Read the full article at SoonerPolitics.org here.

Column by Alberto Soto: The Facts on Oil and Gas Taxation

This column is from Alberto Soto, a Republican small businessman from Tahlequah:

“If the facts don’t fit the theory, change the facts.”
― Albert Einstein

“The people” want more money for education, for health care, for social services but they want someone else to pay for those increases. How did we as a country get to the point where it is okay to pass the burden of our wants onto others like the oil industry, business, corporations and rich people? How is this fair? How is this not just evil greed on the part of those who want it all but wish to pay for none of it?

How can I say this when the rich keep getting richer and as liberal democrats like Mr. Inman (who is running for governor) insist that it is the rich who are getting rich off the backs of the poor and middle class.

Scott Inman:

File this in the “You Can’t Make This Up” category.
To date, House and Senate Republicans have refused to raise the GPT on oil and gas companies or restore the income tax cuts for the wealthiest of our citizens . . . We will not sit by quietly as the folks in charge shift the tax burden from their wealthy contributors through income tax cuts, gross production tax cuts, and corporate tax credits on to the backs of middle-class families.

or as Nick Singer says, from a post that Scott reposted on his personal page says,

OCPA announces intent to file Supreme Court challenge of income tax increase

OCPA announces intent to file Supreme Court challenge of income tax increase
OKLAHOMA CITY (May 22, 2017) – Today, the Oklahoma House of Representatives passed House Bill 2403 by a vote of 56 to 40. The bill would restrict itemized deductions in order to increase personal income tax collections by more than $101 million annually.

Jonathan Small, president of the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, issued the following statement after today’s vote on HB 2403:

“House Bill 2403 is an unconstitutional tax hike on working Oklahoma families and senior citizens. Should House Bill 2403 become law, we intend to challenge its constitutionality at the Oklahoma Supreme Court as a violation of State Question 640.

“House Bill 2403 is designed to raise revenue for state government, but it passed the state House of Representatives with far less than a three-fourths vote. This makes it a blatant violation of Oklahoma’s Constitution, suggesting our state’s highest Court would strike it down.

“This bill is an income tax increase of over $101 million a year that targets Oklahomans who own a home with a mortgage, who pay property taxes that support local schools and other services, or who are being crushed by heavy medical bills.

Jason Murphey: Taxing Netflix

Last Monday, legislative leaders positioned Oklahoma to join one other state and several left-leaning cities (including Chicago and Pasadena) in enacting a tax on Netflix users and users of other streaming video services including Hulu and Amazon Video…

  Public university funding is way, way out of proportion. And it’s harming the private universities who have to compete at market-set tuition rates.  I’d bet it’s safe to say that if a lawmaker authored a resolution to place a state question on the ballot, to remove taxpayer dollars going to higher ed., then he’d be the biggest hero of the taxpayer.  Another constitutional change needed to for the universities to […]

Read the full article at Oklahoma’s Political News service, www.SoonerPolitics.org .

Will Friday be Taxapalooza?

Facing a shortfall of $878M, legislators have just a few days left to figure out how to deal with it. Friday, May 19th, is the final day that the Oklahoma Legislature can hear and pass any new “revenue raising” (i.e. tax hiking) legislation without goi…